Georgia Tech Research Institute
 
Issues

Feedback (1 of 2)

Issue: The kiosk does not provide sufficient feedback to the user.

Users with different disabilities have different needs for the amount and type of feedback provided by a kiosk. The feedback that is provided may be insufficient because it does not cover the full range of events for which feedback is required, or it may be insufficient because it is provided in a form that is not useful to a user with a particular disability (for example, visual feedback indicating that input has been accepted is not useful to a user who is blind). Providing feedback for a wide range of events and user actions in a variety of sensory modalities is beneficial for all users.

Populations Impacted: Users who are blind; users with low vision; users who are deaf; users who are hard of hearing; users with upper mobility impairments.

Potential Solutions:
  • Ensure that feedback is provided for all relevant events. Provide feedback for all user inputs, system status changes, user or system errors, and other events that are relevant to the user's interaction with the machine. Feedback for different events should be distinct from one another and appropriate to the events represented. For example, a simple click may be sufficient to acknowledge a keypress, but a more prominent tone may be necessary to indicate that an error has occurred.

  • Provide feedback in a visual format. Visual feedback is necessary for users with hearing impairments, but it can also be helpful for users with low vision (if the feedback is sufficiently large or if it also makes use of color or other visual cues), and for users with upper mobility impairments (to help the user determine when unintentional inputs have been made).

  • Provide feedback in an auditory format. Auditory feedback is necessary for users who are blind, and it can also be helpful for users with low vision and for users with upper mobility impairments. Beeps and other sounds help users know that input was accepted (e.g., an item was successfully scanned), and also serve to alert users if an unintentional input was made (e.g., a quantity of "22" was entered instead of "2"). Voice output of more complex data (such as the price of an item that was scanned, or indications of required user actions) helps users with visual impairments verify transactions and allows them to operate kiosks more effectively.

Applicable Guidelines:
ADA-ABA - 707.5
Section 508 - 1194.31(a), 1194.31(b), 1194.31(c), 1194.31(d)
Section 255 - 1193.43(a)(2)(a)
HFDS - 2.6.1, 5.11.1, 5.11.2, 8.15.8.3, 8.18.3.2, 8.18.4.1