Georgia Tech Research Institute
 
Accessibility Assistant

Accessibility Assistant

Issues

Headphone Jacks (5 of 5)

Issue: The placement of the headphone jack allows the headphone cord to interfere with use of the machine.

A user, who is blind, is interacting with a kiosk.  The user is wearing headphones that are plugged into a jack that is located just above the barcode scanner on the machine.  The headphone cord is getting in the way when the user scans an item.

Headphones are typically attached to kiosks by a cord. The placement of the headphone jack could result in the headphone cord resting in an area where it interferes with the use of the machine (for example, the cord may hang in front of the memory card slots of a photo kiosk). If users must change positions to interact with different parts of the machine, headphone cords may restrict range of motion or become unplugged during movement.

Populations Impacted: Users who are hard of hearing; users who are blind; users with low vision; users with upper mobility impairments; users with lower mobility impairments.

Potential Solutions:
  • Consider the expected workflow for the machine, and position the headphone jack so that the headphone cord does not interfere with use of the machine. For example, on a photo kiosk, the headphone jack could be placed on the front of the machine below the memory card slots so that the headphone cord does not block access to the card slots.

  • A user, who is blind, is interacting with a kiosk.  The user is wearing headphones that are plugged into a jack that is located on the front edge of the machine.  The headphone cord does not interfere with the user's actions.
  • Position the headphone jack in a location that allows sufficient range of motion to perform all tasks. Consider the positions in which users, both seated and standing, will occupy when using the device, and place the headphone jack in a location central to those positions. This will allow users the necessary range of motion so they do not accidentally unplug their headphones.

  • Provide support for wireless headphone connectivity. Wired connectors are still the most common methods for connecting headphones, but wireless technologies such as Bluetooth are becoming more prominent. Providing support for wireless headphone connectivity would eliminate interference from headphone cords.

Applicable Guidelines:
ADA-ABA - 308.2.1, 308.2.2, 308.3.1, 308.3.2
Section 508 - 1194.25(j)
HFDS - 6.4.1.12